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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 June 1, 1937 No. 22 



LATE CABLES 



British Minister of Agriculture announces to 
Parliament a program of additional aids to British 
agriculture, for which necessary enabling legislation 
will be asked. For wheat the program contemplates in- 
creasing to 36,000,000 cwt. (67,200,000 bushels) the 
maximum domestic wheat production quota on which pro- 
duction subsidy will be paid. Heretofore subsidy has 
been paid on a maximum of 27,000,000 cwt. (50,400,000 
bushels) . Producers of oats, not also receiving wheat 
subsidy, would receive an annual subsidy per acre equal 
to the difference between the average price of oats 
and 8s. per cwt (56 cents per bushel) for yields up 
to 6 cwt. (21 bushels) per acre. This subsidy would 
be proportionately reduced if total eligible acreage 
exceeds a limit not yet determined and subject to a 
maximum payment per acre of £1 ($4.92). Provisions for 
barley growers are the same as for oats. Proposed plan 
contemplates no additional payments of grain subsidy at 
current grain prices. Since April 18 no payments have 
been made with respect to the wheat subsidy in view of 
the favorable prices prevailing. (Agricultural Attache 
C. C. Taylor, London.) 



290 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No* 22 



GRAINS 



Canadian crop conditions well ad v anced 

The season in Canada is more advanced than it was at this time 
last year, according to a telegram from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
at Ottawa. The seeding of wheat is practically completed throughout the 
Prairie Provinces, and rapid progress is being made with the feed grains. 
In the Province of Manitoba and parts of Saskatchewan and Alberta, con- 
ditions are generally favorable, and the grain crops are growing well 
under the influence of good weather and ample moisture. Lack of rain- 
fall in southern sections of Saskatchewan and Alberta is causing con- 
cern, however; the wheat crop will deteriorate if rains are delayed 
much longer. Soil drifting is widespread in these areas but is not yet 
serious. The outcome of the wheat crop in all the southern part of the 
Wheat Belt is dependent on timely rains. Gr as shoppers are said to be 
numerous, but little damage has been reported as yet. 

PRAIRIE PROVINCES: Acreage of wheat, 1535-1937 



Dominion Bureau of Stat 



Province 


1935 


1936 


1937 a/ 




1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 




2,5S7 
7,500 
13,206 


2,566 
7,360 

14,596 


2,669 
7,2S6 
l4,15S 








23,293 


24,522 


24,113 





farmers' plans are carried out. 



stica, Ottawa, a/ Acreage intended for wheat if 



Feed grain a c reages for 1937 

The indicated area sown to barley for the 1937 harvest in l6 coun- 
tries so far reported is 48, 420,000 acres, an increase of nearly 6 percent 
over that of 1936. The expected increase is largely confined to the United 
States, but there is a slight increase in Canada and in the European coun- 
tries as a whole. The North African countries show a small net decrease. 



The 1937 area sown to oats in 7 countries is indicated to be 
96,409jOOO acres, an increase of 2 percent over that sown in 1936 in the 
same countries. This increase is principally in the United States; 
there is a slight decrease in the European countries and a 2-percent 
decrease in the North African countries. 

Tables showing acreages of barley and oats are found on page 304. 
Current trade and price tables are on page 305* 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



291 



COTTON 

European cotton textile situation continu es i mp rovement 

The generally, good occupation of the cotton textile industry that 
has "been noted in most European countries for some months was continued 
during April, according to a report from the Berlin office of the Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics. The substantial downward movement in the raw 
cotton market, following the sharp rise in March, does not seem to have 
impaired the readiness of buyers to place orders. But it has brought 
reluctance in some quarters to sell for a long period ahead. There is 
fear of eventual cancellation of orders if further price declines should 
occur. 

Sales of cotton yarn and cloth remained rather active in most im- 
portant countries, though some reduction in transactions was evident. 
Buying for internal market demand continued to be the dominant factor 
in April business, although important export sales were also reported, 
notably from the United Kingdom and Italy. In the latter country, 
the export market continued to shape the trend of general mill activity. 
Manufacturing for domestic needs was still restricted but there were 
additional allotments of raw material for this purpose. 

Spot business in raw cotton during April was moderate to quiet 
in most countries, but "buying for forward delivery was reported as sub- 
stantial. United Kingdom interest in early fall shipments of American 
has been enhanced by drought-shortened Argentine receipts and by a re- 
ported scarcity of the better grades of Brazilian in the current Sao 
Paolo harvest. A good general business in Brazilian was nevertheless 
reported, as well as some activity in Egyptian, principally of the Uppers 
types. Prices of American cotton at Liverpool continued unfavorable in 
relation to other growth? by approximately the same margin as a month 
earlier, except that Egyptian became relatively much more expensive. 

The general outlook for the European cotton business in the next 
several months would seem to preclude any great change in the present 
level of mill activity and, therefore, of raw cotton requirements. 
Economic conditions are improving in most countries, and there is no 
immediate, foreseeable change in this tendency now in prospect. The 
situation in Prance, which has not yet "benefited materially from, or 
shared in, the international revival, somewhat impairs the outlook for 
the French cotton textile industry. Substantial advance buying has ac- 
counted to a considerable extent for the recent relatively high rate of 
mill occupation, and this is unlikely to continue in the volume experi- 
enced in previous months. But there is at least some reason to expect 
that more normal forces of recovery will emerge in French developments 



292 



Foreign Crops and. Markets 



Vol. 3^, No. 22 



before long. The outlook for Europe as a whole in the cotton textile bus- 
iness is, therefore, for continued satisfactory operations in the next 
several months. 

Record Japanese cotton mill _p r o duct ion 

The important features of the Japanese cotton situation during the 
months of April were highest yarn production on record, active demand 
for both yarn and cotton, further increased yarn prices, and heavy wharf 
stocks of raw cotton, according to information received by radio from 
Agricultural Commissioner Owen L. Dawson at Shanghai (quoting Vice Consul 
Tenney at Kobe) . 

Japanese imports of American cotton during April amounted to 
216,000 bales of 500 pounds compared with 205,000 bales in March, and 
only S9»000 bales in April 1936. Heavy imports of American cotton are 
expected during the next 2 or 3 months as a result of the filling of 
relatively large future contracts made in November and December at prices 
below .current levels. Total raw cotton imports for April, although 
63,000 bales smaller than in March, were above average for the month. To- 
tal imports for the current season, September-April, are 695*000 bales 
above the same period a year earlier. Japanese importers, however, are 
somewhat concerned over threatened insufficiency of raw cotton during 
the second half of the year as the Government has announced that impor- 
tation of only 3,700,000 bales will be permitted during 1937 • 

The price disparity between American and Indian cotton during 
April continued practically unchanged from February and March. The 
average April prices of American and Indian cotton at Osaka were 17*29 
cents and 12.10 cents per pound, respectively, as compared with March 
prices of 17*10 cents and 11. 89 cents per pound. Although the unfavor- 
able price difference between American and Indian has not changed in 
the past 3 months, it is chiefly responsible for the reduced percentage 
of American in the Japanese imports. 

Cotton wharf stocks at Osaka at the end of April, amounting to 
871,000 bales, were the largest on record and were almost twice the 
volume of the same month a year earlier. Stocks of American, which ac- 
count for over half of the total, are more than double those of April 
1936 and the largest since April 1933* 

The April yarn production of 337*823 bales was the highest on 
record, but only slightly in excess of February and March, which had 2 
and 3 less working days, respectively. Yarn production in Japan has 
been maintained at a very high level since December. Production from 
December to April, inclusive, was 12 percent above that of the same period 
a year earlier. Demand for yarn is so great that mills are reported to 
have sold yarn 5 months ahead. Profits to millers are large with yarn 
prices rising from IS. 78 cants per pound in March to 19*96 cents in April. 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



293 



JAPAN: Raw cotton imports, April 193 7 » with comparisons 

(in " bales of 500 pounds) . 

April 



Growth 



.1936. 



; Bale s 

United States ; 89,000 

Indian j 192,000 

Egyptian I 7,000 

China ; 7,000 

Brazil ! - 

Others j _O,0.00 



Total ; 335,000 



1937 

Bales 

216,000 
164,000 
32,000 
15,000 

32,000 



'1+59,006" 



S e p t emb e r - Apr i 1_ 



1935-36 



Bales 
1,205,000 
S92,000 
73,000 
115,000 
8,000 
158,000 



2,451,000 



1936-37 



Bales 
1,248, 000 
1,221,000- 
17s, 000 
164,000 
122,000 

213 , 000 



3,146,000 



Estimates from trade sources in Japan. 

JAPAN: Wharf stocks of raw cotton, April 30, 1937, with comparisons 



Growth ; 


1936 ; 


1937 


April 30 : 


March 31 


April 30 




Bales ■ 


Bales 


Bales 


United States 


204,000 


389,000 


461,000 


I ndi an 


19s, 000 


290,000 


298,000 


Egyptian 


8,000 


33,ooo 


. 36,000 


Chinese 


7,000 


27,000 


21 , 000 


Brazilian 


1,000 


• 6,000 


5,000 


Others 


■ 44,000 


48,000 


50,000 


Total 


■ 462,000 


793,000 


871,000 



Estimates from trade sources in Japan. 



OILS AND OILSEEDS 

Manch u rian soybean situation 

Recent information indicates that the Manchurian 1937 soybean acre- 
age is expected to be approximately the same as in 1936, according to a 
radiogram received from the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics. Reports indicate that weather conditions have been favorable 
for planting soybeans in most sections of Manchuria. Higher prices for 
the 1936 crop have tended to encourage acreage expansion in South Manchuria, 
while in North Manchuria some decrease is expected, as some shift from 
soybeans to wheat, hemp, and perilla crops has been reported. In 1936, 
the Manchurian soybean area was 8,571)000 acres compared with 8,33^">00O 
acres in 1935* The 1936 acreage produced a crop of 155 1 424,000 bushels 
compared with 141,793,000 bushels in 1935- 

Total soybean exports from Manchuria for the 7 months October-April 
of the 1936-37 crop year were slightly below those of the preceding year 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 3^, No. 22 



in spite of the larger 1936 crop. Prices for soybeans at Dairen this 
season are from $5 to $8 per short ton above those of a year ago. 

Manchurian soybeans and bean oil exports are largely to Europe, 
and Japan is the Principal market for bean cake. No exports of soy- 
beans are made to the United States. Exports of bean cake to the United 
States for the 5 months October-February 1936-37 amounted to 25,000 short 
tons and exports of bean oil for the same period to 2,000 tons. 

The Dairen soybean market during April, according to American Con- 
sul Grummon, was more active than March, and prices during the first half 
of the month were the highest for the current season. Prices declined 
slightly during the last half of the month but had again improved during 
the first week in May. Manchurian soybean quotations on April 30 were 
$Uh,Sl per short ton, c.i.f. Europe for May shipment, while bean oil was 
$117.00 per ton. Daily arrivals of soybeans at Dairen from the interior 
during April were larger than the preceding month. Dairen wharf stocks 
at the end of April were above those at the end of March. 

The Dairen bean oil market during April was fairly active. Oil 
mills, however, have been less active, as a result of the high quota- 
tions for beans. Oil stocks at the end of April were reduced to ap- 
proximately 5j000 tons. With the increased prices for bean cake, 



purchases from Japan have declined. • • 

MANCHURIA: Soybean* exports and surplus, October-April . 1936-37 


Item 


Exports : 


Unexported surplus a/ 


October-April 


April 30 


1935-36 


1936-37 


193 b 


1937 


Bean cake and meal 


•1,000 

short tons 


1,000 
short tons 


1 , 000 
short tons 


1,000 
short tons 


1, 598 
65 
70S 


1,575 

50 

517 


U50 

17 

258 


1,015 

33 

530 . 



a/ Amount in Manchuria estimated by the Shanghai office, Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics. 



MANCHURIA: Price per pound of soybeans at Dairen, May 6, 1937, 



with comparisons 





: 1936 


1937 


Item 


April average 


April 7 


May 6 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




1.U3 
.88 


1.75 
5.U0 
1.16 


1.73 
h.92 

1.18 



June 1, 1,93 ( Foreign Crops and Markets 295 



FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS, 

Unitad' K ingdom imp orts record quant ity of .ci t rus from Palestine 

A record quantity of 7)662,000 "boxes of citrus fruits load "been re- 
ceived in the United Kingdom from Palestine up to the week ended May 11 
of the 1936-37 season, which is virtually the end of the season, compared 
with 54,000,000 boxes in 1935-36 and with 5,250,000 boxes in 193)4-35, ac- 
cording to the Weekly Fruit Intelligence Notes. Of the 193,6-37 imports, 
6,574,000 boxes were oranges' and 1,082,000 boxes were grapefruit. Palestine 
citrus is marketed from October to May. The peak months are January to 
March, inclusive. 

Ex ports of citrus _ fruit s from Sy ria, show increase 

There was a steady increase in the exports of lemons and oranges 
from Syria in the 3-year period, 1933-3*+ to 1935-36, the total reaching 
340,000 boxes in the latter year, of which 7.1 percent was lemons and the 
balance oranges,' according to a report from L. D. Mallory, Assistant 
Agricultural Attache at Paris. Exports of oranges are increasing rela- 
tively more than lemons. Prior to 133*+ the most important countries of 
destination were Turkey and Rumania, but the United Kingdom and France 
are now the chief outlets. The former takes largely lemons and the lat- 
ter oranges. No official production estimates are available, but the 
small 1931 citrus crop was placed at 250,000 metric quintals (about 
800,000 boxes) and the large 1934 crop at 475,000 metric quintals (about 
1,500,000 boxes). These estimates would indicate that the bulk of the 
citrus crop is consumed in Syria. 

Trend of citrus exports from Brazi l i s u pward 

Exports of oranges and grapefruit irom Brazil have trended sharply 
upward in recent years. Exports of oranges in 1936 amounted to 3,217,000 
boxes against 2,640,000 in 1935 and 812,000 boxes in 1932, according to 
information published in the Weekly Fruit Intelligence Notes. The chief 
markets for oranges are the United Kingdom, Argentina, the Netherlands, 
France, and Belgium. Exports of grapefruit although not as large have 
shown a striking growth. Exports amounted to 21, 600 boxes in 193 2 , 
35,500 in 193 4, and 72,685 boxes in 193b. practically all of the grape- 
fruit exported goes to the United Kingdom. The orange export season be- 
gins in April and runs through December, and the grapefruit season runs 
from March to September. 

Citron crop in Sicily ex pe cte d to be larger 

Citron trees blossomed satisfactorily in Sicily, and present in- 
dications point to a crop of at least dOO cars, or about 6,600 short . 
tons, in I337 against the short crop of 450 cars (4,950 tons) in 1936, 



296 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 3^, Wo. 22 



according to a communication from the American Consulate at Palermo. Due 
to the short crop in 1936, prices were high and growers have given their 
groves, which had been neglected in some instances an recent years, ex- 
cellent care. Consequently, it is possible that the 1937 crop may exceed 
600 cars. 

South Afric an drled_ f_ruj.t_exports higher in 19 36 

Total exports of South African dried fruit during 1936 amounted to 
about 17,1^0,000 pounds , which represented an increase of 38 percent above 
those of the preceding year. A sharp expansion of the trade in dried 
apricots to 6,321,000 pounds, or double the preceding year's exports, 
accounted mainly for the increase in total exports of dried fruit. Such 
dried fruits as prunes, peaches, pears, and nectarines, which the Dominion 
exports normally in small quantities, also increased over the preceding 
year. About 9,685,000 pounds of raisins were exported, or approximately 
the same a s in.1935. See table, page 306. 

Regarding the 1937. crop prospects, Consul Hugh S. Miller at 
Capetown comments a s follows.: . Apricots - below normal; peaches - poor; 
pears ~ good; prunes - first grade poor but lower grades normal; raisins - 
good with crops heavy. With the exception of peaches and the better 
grades of prunes, the crops for 1937 are probably satisfactory. 

The bulk of the Union's dried fru.it export trade, particularly 
in raisins and apricots which are the main varieties, is with the United 
Kingdom. In recent years, Canada has also consumed considerable quantities. 
In the 1936 season the export subsidy on raisins was increased to 1 1/8 d. 
(2.3 cents) per pound by the Cooperative fine Growers Association with a 
view to diverting still further the utilisation of grapes from wine pro- 
duction. The subsidy applies only to the Western Province growers. A 
feature of the 1936 raisin crop was that the muscat types graded poorer 
than usual since probably less than 20 percent made first grade. On the 
other hand, ■ about 72 percent of the Sultanas of Western Province and Sk 
percent of the Sultanas of Orange River were first grade. 

Since the best prunes in South Africa run about 50 or 60 to the 
pound, there is some demand for Pacific: Coast prunes of larger sizes 
with 30 or Uo to the pound the popular size* Consul Miller states that 
according to present indications the Dominion's demand for American 
prunes in 1937 should be better than usual. 

1936 European walnut crop large 

The 1936 production of walnuts in the countries of commercial 
importance in Europe is now estimated at about 1,770,000 bags of 110 
pounds, unshelled basis, according to a report from Agricultural Attache, 
H. I. Nielsen, at Paris. This is slightly above the early season fore- 
cast and compares with the 1935 crop of 1,613,000 bags and the 5-year 
average, I929-I933, of 1,571,000 bags. 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



29 7 



As far as the individual producing countries are concerned, the 
walnut crop was light in Italy and about average in Prance. In the four 
Danubian countries of Rumania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Hungary, on the 
other hand, the walnut crop was considerably above average. 

The disposition of the 1936 European walnut crop was characterized 
by somewhat smaller exports of table walnuts than during the preceding 
year. A preliminary survey shows that a total of 500,000 bags of table 
walnuts (110 pounds each), or -'28. 2 percent of the 1936 production, were 
exported as compared with over 534,000 bags, representing 33.2 percent, 
of the 1935 crop. This has resulted in a larger proportion of walnuts 
being shelled than otherwise would have been the case. 



WALNUTS: Estimated production in specified European countries, 
average 1929-1933, annual 1934-1936 
(Unsheiled basis - bags of 110 pounds) 



Countrv =>nd v^ri ptv 


• Average 


1934 


. 1935 


■ 1936 pre- 


■1929-1933 


: liminary 


Italy 


' 1.000 bags 


UQQOjaaga 


l,0C0.iiags. 


■1,000 baga 






'265 


275 


: 180 






'30 


: 45 


: 35 


Wild Naples 




. 30 


65 


40 


Total Italy 




325 


385 


1 255 


France 














65 


40 


65 






65 


55 


70 






70 


50 


60 


Other Table 




100 


60 


80 


Total table varieties, , 




300 


205 


275. . . . 


Total shelling varietie 


s...: 437 


550 


420 


475 






850 


625 


750 . .... 






220 


210 


300 






130 


80 


175 






. 75 


80' 


90 






60 


33 


60 






150 


200 


JAQ . 






635 


603 


765 






1,810 


1,613 


1,770 


Compiled by Paris office, 


Bureau of Agri 


c\zlturai Economics. 





It is interesting that up until 1933, when Europe was still shipping 
some table walnuts to the United States and when the trade between the 
European countries was not greatly restricted, exports of table walnuts 
from the European producing countries weru larger than in the past 3 years. 
Thus, during the 5-year period 1929-1933, when the total European walnut 
production averaged 1,571,000 bags, a yearly average of about 557,000 
bags, or 35.5 percent of the crop was exported. In recent years, 



298 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 22 



however, it has become increasingly difficult to place the surplus 
table walnuts, chiefly because of numerous trade restrictive measures 
and competition in European markets from walnuts produced outside of 
Europe. 



WALNUTS, UNSHELLED: Exports from specified European countries, 
average 1929-30 to 1933-34, annual 1934-35 to 1936-37 



(In 


bags of 110 rounds) 








Average 








Country 


1929-30 to 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 




1933-34 








Italy (a) 


Bags 


Bags 


Bags 


Bags 


136,400 


115,000 


131,000 


b/ 79,000 


France (a) 


178,320 


103,000 


77,000 


b/ 88,000 


Rumania . 


98,608 


145,932 


a/110,000 


c/127,000 


Yugoslavia . 


84,568 


64,242 


26, 605 


c/ 37,481 


Bulgaria 


. 22,481 


44,796 


60 ,263 


c/ 62,680 


Turkey 


3c v 775 


^a/_75^000 


a/130,000 


b/ 90.000 


. Total 


557,152 


548 , 020 


534,868 


j 484.161 



Compiled by Paris office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Crop year 
basis, September through August. 

a/ Estimated, b/ To end of February only. c/ To end of January only. 



WALNUTS, SHELLED; Net exports from specified European countries, 
Average 1929-30 to 1933-34, annual 1934-35 to 1936-37 





Ave rage 








Country 


1929-30 to 


, 1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 




1933-34 










Cases 


Cases 


Cases 


Cases 


Italy (a) 


7 , 660 


7,000 


3,500 " 


b/ ' 2,000 


France (a) 


200,800 


133,000 


85 , 000 


b/ 82,000 


Spain (a) 


4,480 


1,500 


1,500 


c/ 


Rumania 


17,344 


19,520 


a/ 42,000 


a/ 48,764 


Yugoslavia 


1,958 


8,553 


2,675 


d/ 5,798 


Bulgaria 


4,125 


1,405 


2,845 


b/ 3,165 


Turkey 


26,543 


a/ 45,000 


a/ 40,000 


a/ 25,000 


Hungary 


510 


0 


0 


0 


Total 


263 , 520 


215,978 


177,520 


166,727 



Compiled by Paris office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Crop year 
basis, September through August, a/ Estimated, b/ To end of February 
only, c/ Not available, d/ To end of Ja.nua.ry only. 



Shelled walnuts are an important factor in the disposition of the 
European walnut crop. Net exports during the 5 seasons 1929-30 to 1933-34, 
averaged 263,520 cases of 55 pounds, of which 200,800 cases or 76 percent 
were exported from France. But as in the ca.se of table walnuts the trend of 
exports of the shelled product has been downward, although some revival is 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



299 



taking place at the present time. Hie decline in exports of shelled 
walnuts was greatest in the case of Trance, where the high cost of 
shelling as well as the low prices for unshelled walnuts has resulted 
in an increase in the domestic consumption of the unshelled product. 
On the other hand, the increase in exports of shelled walnuts from 
Rumania, Yugoslavia, and Turkey was caused mainly "by the comparatively 
low cost of nuts for shelling and the cheap labor. 

It is "believed that the total exports of shelled walnuts from the 
1936 European crop will approximate 240,000 cases. While this will repre- 
sent an increase of 35 percent when compared with the 177,520 cases esti- 
mated to have "been exported from the 1935 production, it will still "be 
slightly below the 5-year average, 1929-30 to 1933-34, of 263,520 cases. 

LIVESTOCK, ''EATS, AND WOOL 

Unite d States trad e in pork 

Exports of pork, excluding edible offal and lard, from the United 
States during the past 10 years have declined until for the first 3 months 
of 1937 they were exceeded by imports. Wet exports in 1928 amounted to 
over 295,000,000 pounds. In 1936 they had fallen to less than 33,000,000 
pounds, and during the period January-March 1937 net imports of pork 
amounted to over 4,500,000 pounds. See tables, page 307. 

Imports of pork have never represented more than a very small 
fraction of total domestic production. When adverse weather conditions 
in 1934 and 1936 caused the material reduction in hog numbers in the 
United States at the same time that improved economic conditions had in- 
creased consumer demand for pork, imports of pork rose in response to the 
higher prices thus occasioned, until* in 1936 they totaled 42,000,000 
pounds. But this amount was still only a fraction of 1 percent of total 
domestic production. Though imports in the early months of the current 
year have been the highest ever recorded, they may be expected to decline 
when domestic feed crops are normal and hog numbers and pork production 
return to their more usual levels. See table, page 307. The conditions 
which brought about the increased imports in the period 19 35-1937 also 
were largely responsible for the sharp decline in exports during the same 
period. 

Exports of pork from the United States declined by 48 percent from 
1929 to 1934. The depression brought with it new and increasingly re- 
strictive trade barriers against po^-k products in the principal foreign 
markets for American pork. Assuming a substantial increase from present 
levels in United States production, the degree to which the United States 
will regain its export trade in pork products will depend largely upon 
trade policy and the attitude toward domestic production in the countries 
formerly importa.nt as markets for American pork. Most of the trade agree- 
ments concluded to date contain some concessions on American pork. 



300 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, Ho. 22 



The United Kingdom has always "been the principal foreign market for 
United States cured and fresh pork, and until recently the United States 
furnished the hulk (80 percent in 1928 and 83 percent in 1929) of that 
country's imports of the cured pork represented hy hams and shoulders. This 
item represents approximately 50 percent of total United States exports of 
pork. United States .exports to G-reat Britain were reduced from nearly 
177,000,000 pounds in 1928 to less than 54,000,000 pounds in 1936. The 
decline was due only partly to the introduction in Great Britain of an 
import restriction policy for cured and fresh pork imports. Exports from 
the United States declined from 1930 to 1932 largely as a result of heavy 
continental European supplies and unattractive prices in the British market. 

No artificial restrictions were placed on the imports of pork prod- 
ucts into G-reat Britain until the end Of 1932. Then the United States share 
in the total quota exceeded the amount of the reduced imports from the 
United States in the year immediately preceding the imposition of the quota,. 
During 1933 and 1934 these import restrictions, accompanied as they were hy 
higher and stabilized prices in the British market, undoubtedly did re- 
strict American shipments of pork to Great Britain. Subsequently the drastic 
decline in domestic production in the United States, occasioned by the drought 
and accompanied by unusually high domestic prices, has been more effective 
than any trade barriers in reducing American exports. In fact, the British 
quota has not been- completely utilized by American exporters since 1934. 

In 1928 continental Earope took 17.5 percent of all cured and fresh 
pork exported from the United States. By 1934 the German market had been 
lost entirely through artificial restriction of imports, and such other 
important markets as Italy, Poland, Finland, the Netherlands, and Belgium 
had been greatly curtailed by various protective measures and by the gen- 
erally unfavorable economic conditions. In many European countries for- 
merly deficient in pork, the hog industry has been expanded, in some cases 
to the extent of supplying an export surplus. Poland is an outstanding 
example of this development. That country in 1928 imported over 9,000,000 
pounds of cured pork from the United States and exported less than 12,000 
pounds to the United States. In 1936, however, the United States received 
over 19,000,000 pounds, mostly in the form of canned ha.ms, from Poland and 
exported only 57,000 pounds to that country. 

Approximately 17 percent of all exports of cured and fresh pork from 
the United States in 1928 were taken by Latin American countries. Cuba 
alone took 36,000,000 pounds, or nearly 12 percent of the total, and small 
quantities went to practicably every South and Central American country, as 
well as to Mexico and the various islands of the West Indies. The high 
import duties imposed by Cuba prior to the trade agreement that was concluded 
late in 1934 were accompanied by a marked decline in exports to that country. 
After the agreement, trade with Cuba expanded somewhat. There is ree,son to 
believe that the Cuban and other Latin- American markets will recover further 
as American export supplies increase, especially in those countries with 
which trade agreements have been concluded. 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



301 



The trade agreement between the United States and Canada also con- 
tained concessions to the United States on pork products. The trade in 
cured pork "between' the United' States and Canada has always been two-way, 
with net exports from the United States of 7,755,000 pounds, or 2.5 per- 
cent of the United -States- total exports', in 1928. For 1936, the trade showed 
a net inport balance for the United States of 9,600,000 pounds, 34 percent 
of the total United States imports of pork during that period coming from 
Canada. Canadian cured and fresh pork also has tended to fill the defi- 
ciency in the British market caused by reduced American shipments. 
In 1928-29 the United States supplied about 15 percent of total imports of 
cured pork and 80 percent of ham imports into the United 'Kingdom, and Canada 
supplied only 3 percent and 9.5 percent, respectively, but in 1935-36 Canada 
supplied over 16 percent of the total and 37 percent of the ham imports and the 
United States 5 percent and 53 percent, respectively. The Canadian cured 
pork is not restricted in the British market by quota and is assured free 
and practically unlimited entry under the terms of the Ottawa Agreements. 

European wool markets less active 



A somewhat easier tone predominated in both English and continental 
wool circles to the middle of May, according to information available in 
the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. As the selling season in primary 
markets is closing, developments in the consuming countries have made wool 
buyers somewhat more cautious, notably in the' British markets. 

In Great Britain, financial end tax questions and the slow devel- 
opment of new business in tops and yarns ha^ye reacted sornewhat unfavorably 
on wool values, according to Consul E. E'. Evans at Bradford. A material 
decline is regarded as improbable, however, in view of the strong basic 
position of wool supplies and the relatively small stocks in nearby positions. 
No prospect is seen for cheeper wool in bulk until the new clip becomes 
available. This fact provides a firm undertone even during a period of quiet 
trading. Values established at the London sales were still high with respect 
to the price procurable by topmakcrs. Business in yarns has been slow, with 
an irregular tone dominating the piece-goods trade. 

At the colonial wool sales in London, which closed May 6, the Con- 
tinent provided most of the support given merino wools. The continental 
wool textile industry remained in a fairly favorable condition in April and 
early May. Slight recessions, however, were evident in France, and to some 
extent in Belgium, according to L. V. Steere, Agricultural Attache at 
Berlin. The previously active buying appee.red to be giving way, e,t least 
in Fre„nce, to a somewhat quieter trade. French export difficulties were 
reported simultaneously with reports of an increased Italian export busi- ' ' 
ness. Supplies of raw wool in Germany continued deficient, and heavy -sub-- 1 ' 
stitution of reclaimed fibers and of cell-wool is melcing for a noticeable 
deterioration in quality. 



302 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 22 



WHEAT, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries ' 

as given, by c urrent trade sources, 1934-35 to_ 1936-37. 

; 'Total : Shipments 1937 ■ Shipments 

| shipm ents ! week ended "| 'July 1- May '21 

Country I i 1 " ■ "1 ~~ ~~ 

: 1934-3S 1935-36: May 8 j May 15 j May 22 "1935-36; 1936-37 

i l.ooo ; i.ooo : -l.ooo : i.ooo • 1,000 1 1,000 : i;ooo 

■bushels ; bushels! bushels bushels; bushels bushels bushels 

North America a/. . : 162 , 832J 219 , 638: 2, 792: 4,832 j 4,499 '186,36.0 j204, 225 

Canada, ■ ; : .j ; ■ ; 

4 markets b/. \ 176, 059: 246, 199- 1 1,-903 | 2,341: 2,804:219,517:180,813 

United States c/ j 31,532: 15,930! 2 78! 207; 243: 6,562! 8,357 

Argentina ; 136,228: 77,3841 1, 696 • 2^076 : 1,990:72,940:156,300 

Australia i 111, 628: 110,060: 2,236: 3,056: 3,222:103,004:89,294 

U-S.S.R ! 1,672; 30,224; Ol 6; 0:28,904; 88 

Danube • • : : : ; : • : 

and Bulgaria d/ ..] 4,104 : : 8,216- 2.640; 1,616 j • 1,616.; 8,158:59,592 

British India -c/ 2.318c / 2,529; 8j 55 ; : 512 : 256: 9,448 

Total e/ j 468,782; 448,101; i ■ ;399, 632 : "518, 947 

Total European \ j ! T ' f %t _7 

shipments a/ \ 387, 752^ 355,032; ' 8,448 j j ;306,192 : 411, 880 

Total ex- Europe an j ; : ■*""" ' ; \fj \fj 

shipments a/ j 147 , 938; 133 , 528: 2,104: \ jlll , 608 ;111, 496 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade News, 
b/ Port William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, ethd New Westminster, 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures includes 
North America as reported by Broomhall. f/ To May 8. 



CZECHOSLOVAKIA: Area sown to .specified crops, 1932-1937 



• Wheat ; : ; ; Corn : 

Year ; including; Rye i Barley i Oats \ unmixed 'Flaxseed 
J spelt j ; __; j crop : 

; 1,000 ; 1,000 ; 1,000 ; 1,000 ; 1,000 ; 1,000 

• acres '• acres ; ac re s ; ac re s • acre s ; acres 

1932 ...... i 2,092 j 2,585 j. 1,762 j 2,027 j 182 j 16 

1933 ; 2,272 j 2,595 j 1;642 \ 1,983 j 178 j 18 

1934 ; 2,329 j 2,473 j 1,644 j 1,971 S 218 ! 23 

1935 J 2,387 j 2,514 | 1,600 i 1,921 ' 193 ! 33 

1936 ; 2,296 j 2,510 j 1,571 ! 1,894 i 212 : 40 

1937 | 2,123 j 2,437 ; 1,630 ! 1,937 ; 238 ; 43 



International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 



June 1, • 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 303 



WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of July futures 



a/ Conversions at noon "buying rate of exchange . 
to other prices 



j-'a wo 


Chicago 


Kansas City 


— — 

Mi nne 




apolis 


Winnipeg 


: a/ 


Liverpool 3/ 


z iiuenos 
Aires b/ 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


"! Q r Z r ' 


i Q r V"> 
i iJO I 


1935 ;1S 


37~ 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


; Cent s 


Ce nt s 


'. Oe nt s 


Cents ;Conts 


Cents 


Conts 


Cents 


Cents 


High c / . 


94 


130 


' 93 


r~i25 


104 


• 142 


84; 


145 


' 94 


154 


9i ;. 


126 


Lot; cj, . 


84 


115 


30 


: 112 


90 


: 124 


75 | 


124 


86 


131 


90 


113 


May 1 . . . 


86 


- 120 


83 


: 116 


96 


: 130 


79 • 


131 


91 


137 


90 


120 


8. . . 


87 


117 


83 : 


: 113 


93 


i 126 


78 ■ 


128 


89 


137 


90 


122 


15. . . 


86 


118 


81 


i 115 


91 


'; 127 


78 ; 


130 


89 


138 


90 


120 


22. . . 


85 


122 


81 


• 119 


92 


: 132 


■75 i 


133 


86 


143 


d/90 


120 



Prices are of day previous 



c/ April 1 to date, d/ August futures. 
WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





All 


classe e 


Ho. 


2 


No. 


1 


No. 2 Hard. 


No. 


2 


Western 


Week 


and 


grades 


Hard Winter 


Dk.N.Sp 


ring 


Amber 


Durum 


Red Winter 


White 


ended 


six 


markets 


Kansas City 


Mi nne an 


oils 


Minneapolis 


T 

O \J • X. 


jO-uis 


Seattle a/ 




1935 


■ 1937 


. 1936 


1937 


1936 : 1937 


1936 


1 937 


1936 


• 1937 


1936' 


1937 




Cents 


■ Cents 


'Cents 


Cents 


Cents 'C 


ents 


Cents 


'Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents' 


Cents 


High b/. 


98 


: 146 


I 106 


144 


' 127 r 


170 


~ no" 


] 99 


no" 


147" 


' 87. 


~~ 122 


Low b_7. . 


87 


; 130 


: 93 


130 


108 : 


142 


103 


; 125 


100 


131- 


80 


112 


May 1 . . . 


93 


: 132 


1 101 


134 


121 ; 


150 


109 


; 125 


106 


136 


84 


117 


8. . . 


92 


: 133 


• 96 


136 


lis : 


142 


103 


\ 128 


102 


136 


82 


118 


15.. . 


87 


: 130 


i 93 


130 


108 i 


146 


106 


1 128 


100 


131 


80 


112 


22. . . 


90 


: 132 


' 94 


132 


112 ; 


147 


108 


130 


101 




81 





a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis Ho. 1 sacked. ~b_/ Apr.l to date 



WHEAT : Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-36 and 1936-37 



Year 
beginning 






Pott 


erdaffi 




Berlin 

0/ 




; England 


Range 


Hard 
Winter 


Manitoba 
No. 3 


Argentina 
?J 


Australia 
\i 


Pa.ri s 


; and 
• Wales 


July 




Ho. 2 


Domestic 


1935-36 d/ 




Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


: Gents 


High 


e/103 


104 


98 


98 


232 


138 


; 90 


1936-37 d/ 


Low 


e/ 74 


82 ' 


63 


71 


209 


121 


; 59 


High- 


e/ 154 


165 


: - 150 


:m 


233 


204 


i 134 




Low 


e/101 


99 


99 


100 


209 


177 


: 91 


Apr. 1. . . 




e/l51 


165 


146 


147 


223 




j 124 


8. . . 




e/l54 


165 


150 


149 • 


223 




; 131 


15. . . 




e/149 


157 


145 


151 


223 




: 134 


22. . . 




e/146 


153 


145 


145 


223 




• 135 


29. . . 




e/143 


143 


142 


143 


223 




• 132 


May 6 . . . 




e/l45 


145 


142 


143 


223 




: 130 



Prices at Paris are of day previous to other prices. Prices in England 
Wales are for week ending Saturday. Conversions made at current exchan 
a/ Barusso. b/ E.A.Q. c/ Producer's fixed price from August 16, 1934. 
1 to date, e/ Nominal. 



and 

;e rates, 
d/ July 



504 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 22 



FEED GHAUTS: Acreage, specified countries, annual 1934-37 



Crops by countries 
reported in 1937 



1-D 



BASIS Y 
United Stat 

Canada 

Belgium b/ . 
France b/. . 
Germany b_/ . 
Czechoslovakia 
Yugoslavia b 

Greece 

Bulgaria b/. 
Rumania b / . . 
Poland b_7. . . 

Latvia 

U-S.S.R 

Total Eur op 
Morocco .... 
Algeria. . • • 
Egypt 

Total North 

Africa. (3) 

Total 15 conn 

Estimated Eor 

Hemisphere total 
OATS 
United States. 

Canada 

France by 

Czechoslovakia 
U.S.S.R 

Total Europe 
Morocco 

Algeria 

Total North 

Africa (2) . . 

Total 7 countries 

Estimated Northern 

Hemisphere total 



rie 
hern 



Compiled from official sources, 
a/ Intentions to plant, 
b/ Winter acreage only, 
c/ Plan. 



1934 


1935 ; 1936 ; 


1937 


1937 is 
of 1936 


1~000 ' 
acres 


1,000 
acres 


1,000 
acres 


1,000 
acres 


Percent 


5 , 555 
3,612 ' 


12,371 
3,887 


8,322 
4,432 


a/ 10,901 
a/ 4,450 


131.0 
100.4 


77 
416 
757 
1,632 
570 
526 
446 
200 

77 
445 
20,959 


78 
438 
958 
1,594 
584 
510 
431 
190 

80 
477 
21 , 608 


58 
429 
1,075 
1,565 
597 
548 
355 
197 
64 
468 

c/ 20,150 


58 
436 
1,134 
1 , 630 
605 
509 
431 
180 
62 
501 

c/ 20,068 


100.0 
101. 6 
105.4 
104.2 
101.3 

92.9 
121.1 

91.4 

96.9 
1U < . 1 

99.6 


25,105 


26,948 


25,508 


25 , 514 


100.4 


3,844 

3,131 

284 


4,303 
3,104 
281 


4,104 
3,120 
282 


4,077 
3,104 
274 


99.3 
99.5 

y 7.2 


7 , 3,59 


coo 
{ , bob 


( , OU O 


7,455 


99.3 


43,529 


50,894 


45,768 


48, 420 


105.8 


104,300 


112,300 


105,900 






29 , 455 
13,731 


39 , 831 
14,096 


33, 213 
13,118 


a/ 35,660 
a/ x2,yo0 


107.4 
yb • o 


1 ,983 
1,935 
44 , 505 


? 1 69 
1,898 
45,269 


2,128 
1,888 
c/ 43,525 


2, lib 
1,937 
c/ 43,193 


QQ R 

102.6 
99.2 


48,424 


49 , 336 


47 , 541 


47,248 


99.4 


65 
450 


70 
434 


80 
473 


91 

450 


113.8 
95.1 


515 


504 


553 


541 


97.8 


92,125 


103,767 


94,425 


90,409 


102.1 


133, 600 


I 144 , 300 


135,100 







Percentage 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



305 



PEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 



TTeek 
ended 



Corn 



Chicago 



No. 3 
Yellow 



1936 • 1937 



Futures 



1936- 1937 



Buenos Aire; 
Futures 



1936. 1937 



Rye 



Minne aooli s 



No. 2 



1936; 1937 



Oats 



Chicago 



No. 3 

White 



193 1 



1937 



Barley 



Minneapolis 



No. 2 



1936 • 1937 



High b/. 
Low b/. . 



Apr. 24. 
May 1 . . . 



15. 

22. 



Cent &' 



ents*Cents 



Cents 



Cents 



lents 



Gene s 



Cent s 



ob 
59 

65 
63 
64 
63 
63 



138 
108 

136 
136 
138 
130 
137 



62 
59 
July 
62 
61 
61 
61 
60 



122 
101 

Jul y 

117 
117 
119 
117 

120 



43 
42 
July 



42 
43 
43 
42 
42 



55 
54 

55 
54 
55 
55 
55 



58 
48 

50 
48 
49 
52 

53 



117 
105 

108 
108 
110 
105 
110 



31 

26 

29 
27 
28 
27 

26 



Cents 
55 

49 

55 
• 54 
53 
51 
52 



Cents 



Cents 



74 

58 

62 
64 
61 
67 
59 



137 
109 

118 
126 
122 
117 
109 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations. b/For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 



Export s 
for year 



Shipments 1937, 
week ended a/ 



c ount ry 


1934-35 


193 5-36 


May 8 


May 15 


May 22 


to 


\l 


k/ 


BARLEY, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States. . . . 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


May 22 
Apr. 30 

May 22 
May 22 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


4,050 
14,453 
20, 739 
11.250 


9 ,88 6 
6,882 
9,468 
37.375 


0 

128 
182 


5 

27 
281 


0 

30 
445 


9,110 
4,677 
8,628 
40 , 908 


5,123 
16,541 
13 , 932 

25 , 053 




Danube & 7 J. S. S.R. 


50 . 492 


53.611 










63,323 


60,649 


OATS, EXPORTS: c/ 


1,147 

17,407 

43,753 
. 8,444 


1,429 
14,892 
9,790 
2,847 


2 

731 

0 


0 

420 

0 


4 

117 

0 


May 22- 
Apr. 30 

May 22 
May 22 


925 

12,355 

10 , 103 
1,390 


685 

8,822 

21,718 
810 






Danube & U.S. S.R. 


70,751 


28,958 










24,773 


32,035 


CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States. . . . 
Danube & U.S. S.R. 


880 
14,939 
256,143 
21.882 


885 
14,984 
307 , 638 
8,910 


0 

1,607 
5,607 

25 


0 

918 
8,264 

26 


0 

1,199 
8,047 
77 


Nov. 1 to 


339 
6,972> 
152,584 
6,471 


191 

19 , 047 
220,451 
2,950 


May 22 
May 22 

May 22 






293,844 


332.417 










155,366 


242 , 639 


United States 


41,141 


' 24,521 








Mar. 31 


7,381 


34,214 



Exports as far 
as reported 



July 1 1935-36.1936-37 



Compiled from official and 
nearest to the date shown, 
beginning November 1. 



trade sources. aj~ 
b/ Preliminary. c 



The weeks shown in these columns are 
1 Year beginning July 1» d/ Year 



306 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 22 



DRIED FRUITS: Exports from the Union of South Africa, 
_____ "by months, 1936 and 1937 to date 



Month 





J. *J O \J 




Pounds 


January 


1,875 


February . . . . 


42,900 


March 


701,425 


April 


1,203 ,300 


May 


1,087,400 


June 


341,700 


July 


373,596 


Augub t 


205 , 940 


September. . . . 


153,950 


October 


82,850 


November. . . . 


67,450 


December. . . . 


53,280 



Sultanas 



1937 



Po und s 

45,100 
69,825 



Other Raisins 



1936 



1937 



Pounds ■ 

2,175; 
47, 780; 
109,350 
335,925 
378,063] 
692,715 
691,233 
1,546,930 
1,045,201 
316,506 
115 , 248: 
88,430; 



Pounds 



38,575 





4,315,666 : 


5,369,556; 


6,320,567 




Peache s 


Prunes 


Miscellaneous 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 i 


1937 




Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds ! 


Pounds 


J anuary 

February. . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . 

October 

November. . . . 
December. . . . 


4,350 
54,950 
294,925 
89,900 
49 , 650 

7,300 

7,250 
17,600 
12,500 
. 547 

3,400 


7,425 
4,000 


150 

47,200 
127,875 
12,850 
26,300 
220,200 
62 , 750 
11,000 
18,038 
22 , 750 


5,300 
17,360 


350 j 

14,200 : 

69 , 042 
69 , 443 
88,457 • 
13,933 
9, 731 
1,685 
46,876 
14, 785 
1,117 
5,763 


71,575 

946 


Total 


542,372 




549,113 




335,382 





Apricots 



1936 



1937 



P ounds ■ 

1,708,400 
1,772,925 
977,050! 
496, 715. 
139 , 375. 
244,950 
60, 700 
348,100 
313,623 
71 , 30Q 
107,427 
80,000 



Pounds 

315,150 
328,300 



Compiled in Bureau of Agricultural Economics from official sources. 



June 1, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



307 



Imports and production 
and avera ge f arm price per pound of 



of pork, excluding lard, 
hogs, 1923 to 1937 







Imports 





Product ion 


Percent 


Average 




, - Ham s , 


JrOIK, 






under 


import s 


farm 


Tear 


• should- 


f re sh 


P 1 Cii.1. c u. , 


Total 


Federal 


are of 


price 




' ers and 


> UX 


ba.Lueu. & 




insoecti on 


pro— 


01 


— 


bacon 


frozen 


other 






due 1 1 on 


hogs 




~l AAA 

1 , 000 


X , uou 


1 , uuu 


1 , 000 


1, 000 








p UluillS 


pounds 


p ound s 


pouncts 


? J UU.il CL S 


XT o I UtJIl 0 






to , *JG < 


7,767 


T,~526 




c roq AQR 


\J • CjX. 




1929 


2,084 


4,124 


2,314 


8 , 522 


6,023,286 


0.14 


9.33 


1930 


1,980 


1,093 


1,583 


4,656 


5, 638,487 


0.08 


8.78 


1931 


1,979 


754 


1,234 


3,967 


5,707,530 


.0.Q7 


5.83 


1932 


3,015 


1,650 


1,101 


5,766 


5, 680,395 


0.10 


3.44 


1933 


1, 672 


539 


703 


2,914 


5, 932,126 


0.05 


3.94 


1934 


969 


182 


495 


1, 646 


5,395,287 


0.03 


4.17 


1935 


5,297 


3,923 


1,274 


10,494 


3,493,838 


0.30 


8.62 


1936 


26,088 


12,945 


2 , 810 


41,843 


4,737,148 


0.88 


9.13 


Jan. -Mar . . 
















1936 


3,972 


2,545 


615 


7,132 


1,155,137 


0.62 


9.14 


1937 : 


13,056 


5,545 


932 


19,533 


1,160, 608 


1.68 


9 . 25 



Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

a/ Actual weight basis, b/ Pork meat 

after excluding head bones and all fa 



s include all of dressed hog 
t rendered into lard. 



carcass 



UNITED STATES: Exports of pork, excluding lard, 1928 to 1937 



Year 



Hams and 
should- 
ers 



1928. . 
1929 . . 
1930. . 
1931. . 
1932. . 
1933. . 
1934. . 
1935. . 
1936. . 
J an. -Mar 

1936. 

1937. 



Export i 



1,000 
pounds 
124^49 
125,797 
120,170 
84,885 
65,213 
78 , 580 
65,104 
55, 380 
42,163 

8,067 
7,545 



Bacon 

and 
sides 



1,000 
pounds 
124,130 
149 , 321 
9 6,784 
38,409 
18,957 
21 , 590: 
18, 621: 
6,311; 
4,562; 

714| 
759: 



Canned 
a/ 



1,000 
poun ds 
14,824 
18,618 
22,176; 
20,447 
15,842 
19 , 722: 
21,227j 
15,464 
14,431 

3,504 
5,889 



Pickled 



,000 
1 ou nd s 
337402 
44,787: 
30 , 628 
15,789! 
15,259: 
16,608 
18,385 
8,276; 
10 , 52Ci 

1,8? 
1,356' 



Eresh 



Total 



1,000 
pounds 
"11,413 
13,539 
17,573 
9,547 
8,133 
14,410 
36,758 
10,208 
2,747 

707 
1,465 



1,000 
p oun ds 
3077918 
352,062 
287,331 
169,077 
123,409 
150,910 
160,095 
95, 639 
74,423 

14,880 
15,014 



Percent 
exports 
are of 
iroducti on_ 

Percent 
4.97 
5.85 
5.10 
2.96 
2.17 
2.54 
2.97 
2.74 
1.57 

1.29 
1.29 



Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
a/ Dressed- weight basis. 



308 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol, 34, Ho. 22 



Index 



Page 

Late ca'bles 289 

Barley: 
Acreage: 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1937 302 

Specified countries, 

1934-1937 304 

Citron, production, Sicily, 

1936,1937 295 

Citrus f rui t: 
Exports: 

Brazil, 1936 295 

Syria, 1934-1936 '. 295 

Corn, acreage, Czeclio Slovakia, 

1932-1937. ' 302 

Cotton: 

Imports, J an an, April 1937 293 

Stocks, -Japan, April 1937 293 

Textile situation, Europe, 

April 1937. '. 291 

Flaxseed, acreage, Czechoslovakia, 

1932-1937. 302 

Fruit (dried), exports, South 

Africa, 1936,1937...... 296,306 

Grains: 

Acreage, specified countries, 

1934-1937 290,304 

Crop conditions, Canada, 

May 1937 , . . , 290 

Movement (feed), principal 

countries, May 22, 1937 305 



Page 

Grains, cont'd: 

Prices ■ (f eed) , principal 

markets, May 22, 1937 305 

Oats:. 

Acreage: 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1937 302 

Specified countries, 
"1934-1937 ■. 304 

pork: 

Exoorts, U.S., 1928-1937 307 

Imports, U.S., 1928-1937 307 

Production, U.S., 1928-1937 307 

Trade,- U.S. , 1936 291 

Rye: 

Apr eag e , C z e cho slovaki a, 

1932-1937 302 

Prices, U.S., May 22, 1937 305 

Soybeans, situation, Manchuria, 

April 1937 • 293 : 

Walnuts: 

Exports, specified countries, 

1934-1936 298 

Production, specified countries, 

1934-1936. . '. 2915 

Wheat : 
Acreage: 

Canada, 1935-1937..' 290 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1937 302 

prices, specified markets, 

May 22, ~ 1937 30$ 

Shipments, principal countries, 

May 21, 1937. . 302 

Wool, markets, Europe, May 1937.. 301